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maevegreen:

teaching-everydayisdifferent:

kateann6:

girlwithalessonplan:

strangenewclassrooms:

I think this would be great to share with students about why they need to not plagiarize. Students need to see the tangible consequences.

Very classy, Buzzfeed.  

My students really don’t understand that plagiarism has real world applications. They think it’s something that is just for school. We had three cases of plagiarism at my school last year (which made our administrator, who was new to the district, realize that we have no real solid code written for plagiarism, but instead it is very open to interpretation). Two of the three students involved, as well as many of their peers, said they didn’t understand why it was a big deal and that if we weren’t in a school it wouldn’t matter. 

I was already planning on doing a mini unit on plagiarism in all my classes (I did a one-day lesson on it last year, but clearly that wasn’t enough), and I think this would be a great article to include. 

Using this!

Excellent example of real-world consequences.

hithertokt:

itsssnix:

I don’t teach debate. Not at all. But I’ve used debate as a method and discovered, more often than not, that my kids tend to talk past one another. The whole idea of addressing the argument of your opponent, whether in formal debate or in classroom discussion has eluded them.

So one of the things…

This is great—so relevant and necessary. And I see a strong parallel to how I teach the basics of writing a strong paragraph/argument via the TAXES structure. Definitely might do this too!

hellomynameismaddy:

Disabled Girls Talk Episode 1: Generation ADA

The full transcript can be found here!

It’s the 24th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Emily and I are starting a podcast! As two disabled girls in our early 20s, we have lots of ~thoughts and feelings~ about what it means to be disabled, and we decided to record the conversations we’re having all the time anyway and share them with the universe. Please signal boost, and let us know what you think! 


Here are some resources for anyone who wants to read up on fandom history, including outlines, old fan fiction, and certain famous drama. Made especially for all the teenagers out there who believe that tumblr created the concept of fandom. (more masterposts)
T H E   B E G I N N I N G S   ( P R E - 1 9 9 0   F A N D O M )

Precursors to Fan FictionThere have been several works that could most definitely be considered the beginnings of fan fiction, and most of them are quite surprising.
The Brontë siblings spent much of their child to young adulthood writing short stories and novels telling the fantasy adventures of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (x)
Sherlock HolmesDespite the buzz around Star Trek being the first, the origin of the modern idea of “fandom” can be traced all the way back to 1887 with the creation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s world famous detective. As well as some of the first ever fan fiction. 
Here’s a video detailing how Holmes started fanfiction. (x)
A blog post about the changes in Sherlock Holmes fandom over time. (x)
"The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" a fanfiction by the creator of Peter Pan. (x)
Star TrekNow we’re at the big one. The real big fandom creator. The Original Series didn’t have a big audience during it’s original run, but those who did watch it were deeply invested in it. This means conventions, mailing groups, fan magazines, and fanfiction presses. 
Spockanalia, the first ever fanzine, appeared in September 1967. Celebrating fan art and even fan fiction. The zine ran from 67’-70’, and published five issues. (x) (x) (x)
The first fan convention occurred in March of 1969. The “Star Trek Con” did not have celebrity guests but did have “slide shows of ‘Trek’ aliens, skits and a fan panel to discuss ‘The Star Trek Phenomenon.’” (x)
"Star Trek Lives!" was the first large scale con and it was in 1970. They expected 500 people, they had to turn down people when there was 3000. (x)
Kirk/Spock is the first official slash ever, and was largely circulated due to fanzines. (x) (x) (x)

E A R L Y   D A Y S   O F   T H E   I N T E R N E T   ( T H E   1 9 9 0 ’ S )

GeocitiesIn 1995, Geocities was born. If you haven’t heard of Geocities(due to it’s death in 2009), it was a Web hosting service, separated into ‘neighborhoods’ named after real cities for what they were famous for. Here, many fandoms shared fan fiction.  Back in the day, fandoms had to create their own private spaces. This made fandoms on the internet smaller and less accessible than fanzine operated ones.
geocities archive (x)
the death of Geocities (x)
Fanfiction.net1998 brought fanfiction.net into existence to compete with the hundreds of independent, fandom-oriented fanfiction archives. More democratization, although fanfiction was marketed on how many reviews one had.
In 2002, due to legal concerns, fanfiction.net bans NC-17 fanfiction. (x)
Adultfanfiction.net is created to fill the void. For years, 13 year olds would pretend to be 18 to enter. That is until, people figure out they can just post it on fanfiction under M. (x)

E A R L Y   2 0 0 0 ’ S   T O   N O W 

The Cassie Clare ControversyYou might recognize Cassandra Clare from the YA series The Mortal Instruments, but in the early 2000s people remember her a bit differently. As a Harry Potter fan fiction writer who caused a big old controversy. 
The Draco Trilogy is a Draco-centric epic written and posted by Cassandra Claire over a period of six years. It was quite popular, and was one of the longest Harry Potter fics out there. (x)
People noticed however, that she lifted scenes and dialog straight from other fiction, causing an uproar and Cassie to be banned from fanfiction.net. (x)
ForumsAround this time, forums come around. People rapidly gained and lost power, causing quick turnover in these parts of fandom. (x)
tumblr.In 2007, tumblr is created, however it doesn’t really become popular until 2010 and due to the death of Geocities and other popular websites for fandom and it’s less strict guidelines, it becomes a major fandom stronghold. 
Tumblr and fandom (x)

Here are some resources for anyone who wants to read up on fandom history, including outlines, old fan fiction, and certain famous drama. Made especially for all the teenagers out there who believe that tumblr created the concept of fandom.
(more masterposts)

T H E   B E G I N N I N G S   ( P R E - 1 9 9 0   F A N D O M )

Precursors to Fan Fiction
There have been several works that could most definitely be considered the beginnings of fan fiction, and most of them are quite surprising.

  • The Brontë siblings spent much of their child to young adulthood writing short stories and novels telling the fantasy adventures of Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington. (x)

Sherlock Holmes
Despite the buzz around Star Trek being the first, the origin of the modern idea of “fandom” can be traced all the way back to 1887 with the creation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s world famous detective. As well as some of the first ever fan fiction. 

  • Here’s a video detailing how Holmes started fanfiction. (x)
  • A blog post about the changes in Sherlock Holmes fandom over time. (x)
  • "The Adventure of the Two Collaborators" a fanfiction by the creator of Peter Pan. (x)

Star Trek
Now we’re at the big one. The real big fandom creator. The Original Series didn’t have a big audience during it’s original run, but those who did watch it were deeply invested in it. This means conventions, mailing groups, fan magazines, and fanfiction presses. 

  • Spockanalia, the first ever fanzine, appeared in September 1967. Celebrating fan art and even fan fiction. The zine ran from 67’-70’, and published five issues. (x) (x) (x)
  • The first fan convention occurred in March of 1969. The “Star Trek Con” did not have celebrity guests but did have “slide shows of ‘Trek’ aliens, skits and a fan panel to discuss ‘The Star Trek Phenomenon.’” (x)
  • "Star Trek Lives!" was the first large scale con and it was in 1970. They expected 500 people, they had to turn down people when there was 3000. (x)
  • Kirk/Spock is the first official slash ever, and was largely circulated due to fanzines. (x) (x) (x)

E A R L Y   D A Y S   O F   T H E   I N T E R N E T   ( T H E   1 9 9 0 ’ S )

Geocities
In 1995, Geocities was born. If you haven’t heard of Geocities(due to it’s death in 2009), it was a Web hosting service, separated into ‘neighborhoods’ named after real cities for what they were famous for. Here, many fandoms shared fan fiction.  Back in the day, fandoms had to create their own private spaces. This made fandoms on the internet smaller and less accessible than fanzine operated ones.

  • geocities archive (x)
  • the death of Geocities (x)

Fanfiction.net
1998 brought fanfiction.net into existence to compete with the hundreds of independent, fandom-oriented fanfiction archives. More democratization, although fanfiction was marketed on how many reviews one had.

  • In 2002, due to legal concerns, fanfiction.net bans NC-17 fanfiction. (x)
  • Adultfanfiction.net is created to fill the void. For years, 13 year olds would pretend to be 18 to enter. That is until, people figure out they can just post it on fanfiction under M. (x)

E A R L Y   2 0 0 0 ’ S   T O   N O W 

The Cassie Clare Controversy
You might recognize Cassandra Clare from the YA series The Mortal Instruments, but in 
the early 2000s people remember her a bit differently. As a Harry Potter fan fiction writer who caused a big old controversy. 

  • The Draco Trilogy is a Draco-centric epic written and posted by Cassandra Claire over a period of six years. It was quite popular, and was one of the longest Harry Potter fics out there. (x)
  • People noticed however, that she lifted scenes and dialog straight from other fiction, causing an uproar and Cassie to be banned from fanfiction.net. (x)

Forums
Around this time, forums come around. People rapidly gained and lost power, causing quick turnover in these parts of fandom. (x)

tumblr.
In 2007, tumblr is created, however it doesn’t really become popular until 2010 and due to the death of Geocities and other popular websites for fandom and it’s less strict guidelines, it becomes a major fandom stronghold. 

  • Tumblr and fandom (x)

realsocialskills:

People with certain disabilities often have heavy disability accents. Their speech can sound very different from the way most nondisabled people speak.

People with disabilities that affect communication are often pushed into separate programs, particularly in adulthood….

lordhayati:


drtanner:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:


A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.
If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.
Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.
Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Holy shit. 
Bread is serious fucking business.


Man the bread fandom don’t put up with shit at all.

lordhayati:

drtanner:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

Holy shit. 

Bread is serious fucking business.

Man the bread fandom don’t put up with shit at all.

And how hard is it to land even a minimum-wage job? This year, the Ivy League college admissions acceptance rate was 8.9%. Last year, when Walmart opened its first store in Washington, D.C., there were more than 23,000 applications for 600 jobs, which resulted in an acceptance rate of 2.6%, making the big box store about twice as selective as Harvard and five times as choosy as Cornell. Telling unemployed people to get off their couches (or out of the cars they live in or the shelters where they sleep) and get a job makes as much sense as telling them to go study at Harvard.
awesomedigitalart:

Beneath the Surface by juliedillon

almightykushlord:

Dakarai Molokomme, a 15-year-old starving child from a small village in Zimbabwe, has just told , one of the most famous pop stars in the world, to  and f*** , the local media are reporting exclusively.

“Yes, it’s true, I told Madonna to go f*** herself. Do you want to know why?” Dakarai asked. “It’s the same thing every time with these snobby rich Americans. Every once in a while they come to show us their support for the so-called eradication of poverty by adopting a child from a starving family, but they actually do more harm than good. Transracial international adoptions are part of the white savior industrial complex,” Dakarai explained.

In further discussions with journalists from the media, the  stated that “none of the children here actually want to be taken away from their family and friends so they can be displayed as some kind of trophy in the homes of self-righteous singers or actors who want to score some points with the media and Oprah.”

“If they really want to help us, they should get Big Pharma to ship us some anti-retroviral drugs for the AIDS epidemic, or build schools and hospitals. If they don’t want to do that, then they can all go f** themselves!” the child told reporters.

The 15-year-old also stated that he would say the same thing to any one of those American or European “faux humanitarian posers”, except for Bono, whom he said he would also kick in the groin.

“Bono’s efforts to save the African savage from itself prove that the colonial imperative is alive and well,” Dakarai said as he walked with other village children collecting sticks to build a tree fort.

THIS IS THE RAWEST 15 YEAR OLD ALIVE

piratejeni:

Three years of Food Network Magazines are now one 3 ring binder

4gifs:

The water is lava. [video]

4gifs:

The water is lava. [video]

miserylullabies:

supamuthafuckinvillain:

Realization hits hard

#the realization blue you away didn’t it

girlcanteach:

Just something I’m trying with my students to help them consider the power of words. Thought I’d share.

Choose an article, essay, speech or story that you have read this week and found to be particularly beautiful, effective, or compelling. The goal in this assignment is for you to analyze the…